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Today, unvented cylinders are the most frequently recommended option for residential hot water needs. They offer superior pressure in the shower and at the taps compared to vented cylinders. They do not take up as much room as vented cylinders, and they can be installed just about anywhere that there’s access to the mains, as well. However, they can suffer from a few common issues. For homeowners, it’s important to understand the most common problems you might face with an unvented cylinder.   No Hot Water   Perhaps the single most common problem you might experience with an unvented cylinder is no hot water. This can present as cold water when you open the hot tap, or no water flow at all from the hot tap. A couple of different issues can cause this problem, including no power to the water heater due to a tripped circuit breaker, or a problem with the residual current device installed on the unit. Regular maintenance will ensure that there are no reasons for your water heater to trip the breaker and that the RCD is in good working condition, as well.   Thermostat Issues   Your unvented cylinder will be equipped with a thermostat. This allows you to set the temperature on the water heater to your preferences (and to ensure safety for members of your household). It is also an important tool for helping to prevent overheating and overpressure situations. It is possible for the thermostat to malfunction in a number of ways, all of which can be prevented through annual inspections and regular maintenance by a G3-certified plumber.   Expansion Vessel or Air Bubble Problems   Unvented cylinders have either an expansion tank or an air bubble system. This allows the unit to accommodate the increased volume of heated water without any danger. However, both expansion tanks and air bubble systems can become depleted over time. This mean there is less expansion room for heated water and increased risk for your home. Annual maintenance is the best way to avoid this problem.   Pressure Relief Valve   Hot water creates a great deal of pressure within an unvented cylinder. If this builds up to dangerous levels, the tank could split. A pressure relief valve helps prevent this from happening by allowing excess pressure to be vented. If the valve fails, this cannot happen, though. Again, annual maintenance ensures that this valve is in working order.   Pressure Reducing Valve Failure   Because an unvented cylinder is connected directly to the mains, a pressure reducing valve is needed to ensure that incoming water pressure remains at a safe level. If the valve were to fail, the cylinder could become over pressured. Annual service ensures that your valve remains in good working condition.   As you can see, the single most important thing to do to prevent these common problems with unvented cylinders is to ensure that your water heater is properly serviced and maintained. Call EasyFlow on 0161 941 5571 to schedule your maintenance.

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You need hot water for showers, washing up, doing dishes, and more. While the right brand of water cylinder will ensure that you have reliable operation and fewer hassles, you still need to ensure that you choose the right size for your needs. It’s actually pretty simple to determine what size cylinder you need for your family. We’ll walk you through everything below. Why Does It Matter? First, let’s address why size matters in the first place. While we are talking about physical dimensions, what we’re really discussing here is volume. The more volume the cylinder holds, the more hot water you’ll have at one time. That means more showers, more loads of dishes, etc. However, the larger the cylinder and the more water it holds, the more energy it will require to heat up to temp in the first place, which means your costs will be higher, too. The Rule of Thumb The UK’s Hot Water Association offers a good rule of thumb that may help you estimate the size of your hot water cylinder. In a home with low consumption, you’ll need 20 to 30 litres of hot water per person per day. In a home with average consumption, you’ll need 30 to 50 litres of hot water per person per day. In a high-consumption home, you’ll need 50 to 70 litres of hot water per person per day. However, remember that this is only for personal use – showering and the like. It does not include any other uses, such as heating. General Size Considerations In general, our recommendations for cylinder size are based on the number of bedrooms and bathrooms in your home. We’ve included a handy sizing chart below for your reference. # of Bedrooms # of Bathrooms Cylinder Size in Litres 1 1 120 litres minimum 2 1 150 litres minimum 3 Up to 2 180 litres minimum 4 2 210 litres minimum 5 and up 2 and up 300 litres minimum *Note that these sizes are for direct/unvented cylinders. The chart above should at least give you a starting point. However, there are numerous factors that will influence the size of the cylinder you ultimately choose. For instance, do you use your cylinder for central home heating? For underfloor heating? The more uses the water is put to, the more volume you will need. You will also want to factor in other things in your decision. Number of People: Sometimes, the number of bedrooms does not accurately reflect the number of people living in a home. How many people live under your roof? How frequently do they shower or bathe? Volume of Dishes: How often do you use your automatic dishwasher or wash dishes by hand? Again, this will be affected by the number of people in the household – washing up after a dinner for four will be very different from washing up after a dinner for six or eight people! While we can help you find an estimated size, the best way to ensure accuracy is through a professional in-home assessment. Call EasyFlow today on 0161 941 5571 to schedule an appointment in Greater Manchester or Liverpool

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No Hot Water within Your Cylinder?

We’ve come to rely on our modern creature comforts. When you press the power button, you expect the tele to come on. When you close the lid and press the start button, you expect your clothes washing machine to begin filling with water. When you open your hot water tap, you expect to receive a stream of heated water. However, that does not always happen. If you’ve found that you have no hot water in your cylinder, it can be a frustrating situation, but there is hope. Your unit might need nothing more than a simple reset. How do you reset the cylinder, though? First Things First Before you try to reset the cylinder, check the built-in thermostat to make sure that it has not been bumped or knocked somehow. Even a minor knock could be enough to turn the temperature of your cylinder well below what you would consider hot. If the dial is under 60 degrees Celsius, turn it back to between 60 and 65 degrees and let the water heat back up. Locate the Reset Button First, you will need to locate the reset button on your water cylinder. Usually, this can be found near the thermostat, often just below it. The reset button may be uncovered, or it may have a “lockout” cover. Find the switch and then move on to the next step. Press the Reset Button Once you have located the reset button, press it. If your cylinder has a built-in manually reset safety switch under a lockout cover, you’ll first need to remove the cover, then press the switch. The cylinder should then reset and begin working once more. If the water within the cylinder has cooled off considerably, it may take some time for it to reheat. Be patient. No Visible Reset Button If your cylinder does not have a visible reset button, you are not out of luck. You will simply need to change tactics. Go to your home’s fuse panel/breaker box and locate the circuit breaker that controls your water cylinder. If it is tripped, note this, and then flip it back once more. If it is not tripped, flip it off, wait a couple of seconds, and then flip it back once more. Your cylinder should reset and begin heating the water again. What If You Still Have No Hot Water? There is a chance that resetting the cylinder or turning the power off and back on again will not remedy the situation. In this case, the problem is most likely with the immersion heater and its built-in thermostat. It is not recommended that you attempt to address this problem on your own. Instead, get in touch with Easy Flow and we will get you back up and running in no time. Of course, we’re also happy to be of service at the first sign of trouble, as well.

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There are many different water heater brands on the market for UK residents to choose from. However, Gledhill remain one of the most popular for a number of reasons. The company’s products encompass a wide range of capacities, types and styles, and the also offer good reliability and performance. How do you determine which is the right model for your needs, though?   Going Unvented Before we explore some of the Gledhill water heaters available, we need to say a word about the vented versus unvented argument. Traditionally, only vented water cylinders were used, and gravity was necessary to provide hot water at the taps with any amount of pressure. Today, that's not the case. While unvented cylinders still exist, unvented systems are far better, offering mains pressure hot water at the taps without having to install the water heater in your attic. All of the Gledhill water heaters we discuss below are unvented.   Direct or Indirect One of the first things to consider will be whether you want a direct heated cylinder or an indirectly heated cylinder. While both offer a steady supply of hot water at the taps, they’re not the same. Direct heating is becoming quite popular, and involves the water being heated directly within the cylinder through an immersion heater within the cylinder itself, or by an on-cylinder boiler. In an indirect system, the water is heated elsewhere and then stored in the cylinder. Gledhill offers the Stainlesslite Plus unvented cylinder in both direct and indirect formats to fit your needs.   Vertical or Horizontal Historically, most water cylinders have been vertical in design. Chances are good that when you think of a water heater, you picture an upright cylinder. However, that may or may not be the best option for your home depending on the space constraints within the area where the water heater will be installed. While vertical cylinders are very common, horizontal cylinders offer space savings by turning the water heater on its side. When it comes to Gledhill water heaters, you’ll discover the Stainlesslite Plus horizontal indirect water heater on offer to help you make the most of your available installation space.   Full Bodied or Slimline In addition to installation position (horizontal versus vertical), you also have the option of installing a full-bodied cylinder or a slimline model. If you have plenty of space within the installation area, a full-bodied model is the better option. However, if you have limited space and you cannot make use of a larger water cylinder, then a slimline model is the better option. These offer slightly less storage volume, but put it in a slimmer cylinder that has a small physical footprint. In this case, the Stainlesslite Plus Slimline might be an appropriate choice.   As you can see, there are many potential options, and Gledhill manufacture a range of other choices, too. If you’re struggling to determine the right water heater for your home, call EasyFlow at 0161 941 5571.

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